Prince William National Forest Park
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pic00001Artsy.jpg
pic00001Artsy.jpg

One of the fun things about photography, at least to me, is shape/design. How you look at an object can sometimes change its shape. This is a pine tree, up REAL close.
Pic00002DeadFall.jpg
Pic00002DeadFall.jpg

Again this caught my eye while I was hiking in this lovely National Park because of its shape. But, I wasn't as good of an observer as I thought I was. Part of this "dead fall" had blocked the trail. When I got home I noticed the cut of the chain saw. I thought, while walking, that it was all natural. Rats!
pic00003TreeArt.jpg
pic00003TreeArt.jpg

Isn't this cool. My Mother loved gnarled trees. Although I know that most of these bumps were caused by broken off limbs she would have been sure they were a form of "cancer". She saw cancer everywhere. And that was even before she, herself, got cancer. Interesting.
pic00004SwingBridge.jpg
pic00004SwingBridge.jpg

This is a swinging bridge over one of the tributaries of Quantico Creek. Many of these earlier bridges have had to be replaced because of floods associated with a huricane first in the early 1970's and then again in the 1980's.
pic00005SwingBridge.jpg
pic00005SwingBridge.jpg

This is Quantico Creek. Today it is fairly clean and recent efforts to remove the acid caused by the pyrite mining mentioned later are bringing it back to life. This National Park is within an hour of Washington, D.C. and was once an over-farmed area with few trees. The fields that would hardly grow weeds. It was also the site of a Pyrite Mine. The pyrite was valued for the sulfur trapped inside it. The sulfur was used for medicine, other chemical processes and earlier gunpowder. Eventually it lost its value and the mine closed in the early 1920's. The mine was a huge polluter of the ground and streams. As the sulfur made its way into the nearby streams it caused the water to become acidic and killed everything. Thanks to the C.C.C. in the 1930's and the U.S. Park Service, today it is a climax forest again.
pic00006TrailMarker.jpg
pic00006TrailMarker.jpg

Duh, this is a trial marker. If you have never hiked in a national park you may never have seen one. It and its brothers and sisters are old friends to me.
pic00007DeerTrack.jpg
pic00007DeerTrack.jpg

This once damaged land has made a fantastic come back. White tail deer and other forest animals abound. These are deer tracks in the mud beside the fire road I was walking.
pic00008RRRail.jpg
pic00008RRRail.jpg

Man was EVERYWHERE in this area. And man was not always gentle to the land. This is a railroad rail from what was a "Narrow Guage" railroad that carried the pyrite ore from the grinding mill at the nearby mine into Dumfries VA where it was loaded onto normal railroad cars for the trip to market. This mine, that was left behind when no longer profitable, cause terrible damage to the nearby stream and forest. Not until the EPA with its modern processes was it possible to abate the damage.
pic00009JohnsonCem.jpg
pic00009JohnsonCem.jpg

Man really did live, work and even die on this land. This is the gate to one of the many cemeteries in the park. The bad part is that many of the people that lived in the park didn't have a lot of money. This cemetery has only one readable marker. Many of the other cemeteries have no readable markers.
pic00010WaterTower.jpg
pic00010WaterTower.jpg

This is the water tower at the tent camping ground. I once saw this with icecicles hanging off of it everywhere. I thought I'd get back to take another picture in the winter but never have.

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